How YOU can help!

DONATE A PENNY - OR TWO!


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Our work relies on donations to fund our activities - every penny donated helps animals in emergencies.


<<< DONATE NOW - CLICK PICTURE

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Some of the areas where your donation will assist animals in emergencies.






OUR WISH LIST:

  • Ongoing volunteer insurance                      *  Hospital consumables
  • Large Animal rescue equipment                 *  Generator
  • Enclosed trailer                                             *  Outdoor lighting; torches;headlamps
  • Pop up gazebo                                             *   More committee members
  • Foldup trestle tables                                     *  Graphic artist assistance
  • Fireproof clothing                                          *  That we never have any disasters


GETTING INVOLVED IS EASY !

 Sub-committee members may choose an individual small task or area they wish to develop. Current areas to develop include:

*   Volunteer recruitment & collation

*   Facility collations for Evacuations

*   Donation and Funding avenues

*   Advertising & Promotion

*   Medical supply collation

*   Large Animal Rescue equipment collation              

*   Field triage equipment collation

*  Training development - Basic Fire Ground training; Burns Treatments; Wildlife Treatments; Large      Animal Rescue training; Flood and High water animal rescue.

       DO YOU HAVE AN AREA OF EXPERTISE YOU COULD CONTRIBUTE?

     CAN YOU PERFORM ANY OF THE ABOVE TASKS?

   Being  a sub-committee member is easy - with the majority of communications and tasks being able to be performed from home on your computer. Meetings are held four times a year.

Please contact: Email:  waverinc@gmail.com



  BUSHFIRE SEASON - ARE YOU PREPARED ?


As part of your fire plan consider the following:

*Formulate your plan,have written copies easily accessable on your property, inform neighbours, friends and most importantly, inform the relevant Emergency Services in your area of your plan.

* Your plan should identify the numbers and type of stock on your property, where access gates/roads are located, where emergency (safe) paddocks are located where stock can be moved to.

Decide whether you will evacuate your property or whether you will stay and defend your property. If you have stock you have a responsibility to have a plan in place for their welfare.

* Phone numbers of Emergency Services, family, friends, neighbours, stock transporters.

* Identify what transport you willl need to evacuate your stock. Who has floats or trucks to help you transport your stock.Ensure you have adequate catching & loading facilities on your property. 

* Ensure emergency vehicles and trucks can access your property. Gates need to be  3.6 m wide (12') for trucks. Ensure electric gates and padlocks are accessible or removed.

* Locate suitable evacuation properties in advance and in different localities from your property.

* Ensure your animals can be identified by microchip, brands or eartags.

* Identify a safe,defensable, emergency paddock on your property. 

* Stables ideally should have 2 access doors, good ventilation and water points. Generators for emergency power for water pumps.

* Do not stable horses in a fire emergency. 


CONSIDER HORSE & STOCK BEHAVIOUR IN EMERGENCIES

Always remember that horses will act as prey species, their response to danger will be their flight response. They will panic and flee, risking injury on fences and roads. Stock allowed to run free will cause secondary accidents, especially if on roads.

Therefore in a emergency situation managing the horses, and other farm animals, in a herd will produce the safest and most successful results. If staying to defend your property you need a defensable paddock that all your stock can go in together.

Trying to isolate an animal from its herd will only result in that animal trying to break free and return to the herd. They will move in a herd, trying to stay together for safety.

If not all animals can be caught and led, halter and lead the most dominant animal, lead it to safety so the rest of the herd will follow. 

Remove all halters, rugs and boots once in safe paddock. Falling ash and cinders can cause burns if settling on the animals - watch for this and wash or brush off ash.

Stabled animals

Human life must come first and no-one should enter a burning stable without the help of emergency services. Rescue animals only that can be rescued safely.

Keep halters,leadropes and fire extinguisher handy at all times.

Do not think you can open stable doors and the horses will run out 

Examination of past emergencies shows horses behaviour in a stable fire will not be to run out but to either climb the stable walls or cower at the back of the stable. The stable is their "safe place" so they will try to stay there, even running back into a building  after being let out. (Gimenez R. et al Technical Large Animal Emergency 2008 pp 169-183) 

Experience has shown that to be saved horses must be quickly haltered and led out of the stables. Blindfolded as a least resort. Practice leading your horses in unfamiliar environments.


The most successful outcomes of bush and stable fires comes from properties where people have planned, prepared and practiced their Fire Plan.

© Joan Deetman 2016